Joel R. Beeke

Joel R. Beeke

Dr. Joel R. Beeke serves as President and Professor of Systematic Theology and Homiletics, as well as Academic Dean for students from the Heritage Reformed Congregations. He is currently a pastor of the Heritage Reformed Congregation in Grand Rapids, Michigan, a position he has held for 20 years. He has been in the ministry for 28 years. He is also editor of the Banner of Sovereign Grace Truth, editorial director of Reformation Heritage Books, president of Inheritance Publishers, and vice-president of the Dutch Reformed Translation Society. He has written, co-authored, or edited fifty books and contributed over fifteen hundred articles to Reformed books, journals, periodicals, and encyclopedias. His Ph.D. (1988) from Westminster Theological Seminary is in Reformation and Post-Reformation Theology. He is frequently called upon to lecture at Reformed seminaries and to speak at conferences around the world. He and his wife, Mary, have 3 children: Calvin, Esther, and Lydia.
Occupation President, PRTS
Education Ph.D.

Reviews

Boice, James Montgomery. Genesis. 3 Vols. JMB. Baker Books, 2006.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.9 5
In Creation and Fall, Boice reveals the connection between the biblical account of creation and God’s plan of redemption. A New Beginning traces how God used less-than-perfect men—Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob—to change history. And Living by Faith follows ever-loyal Joseph, a “man for all seasons” and an example for Christians today. 464 pages each, three softcovers from Baker. [Full Review]
Waltke, Bruce K. Genesis: A Commentary. Zondervan, 2001.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
5 5
Hebrew and Old Testament expert Bruce Waltke looks at the book of Genesis as a work of theological literature. Thus, he focuses on primary aspects of the story (narrative), including characterization, plot, theme, scene, structure, foreshadowing and irony, and balances these issues with an emphasis on the theology of Genesis which both shapes and is shaped by the narrative. He looks at the ten divine initiatives in salvation history, each delineated by a “toledot” heading (“the account of the line of…”) followed by a transitional linkage. Waltke interprets the text using twelve levels of signification (sounds, syllables, words, phrases, clauses, sentences, frames/speeches, scene parts or incidents, scenes or episodes, acts or phases, sections/cycles, book/composition), and takes the best of form, source, narrative and literary criticism to offer readers one of the best looks at the theological and literary value of Genesis, the book of beginnings.
Hughes, R. Kent. Genesis: Beginning and Blessing. PtW. Crossway Books, 2004.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.7 5
The book of Genesis lays the groundwork for God’s relationship with humanity and his plan for our salvation. R. Kent Hughes explores this book with the care and insight that are the hallmarks of the Preaching the Word series. [Full Review]
Ryken, Philip Graham. Exodus: Saved for God's Glory. PtW. Crossway Books, 2005.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
5 5
Philip Graham Ryken mines the majestic biblical book of Exodus for knowledge of God’s character and instruction. Ryken’s commentary moves readers to rejoice at God’s work in the life of everyone who is on the path to spiritual freedom. A Preaching the Word commentary. [Full Review]
Currid, John D. Exodus. 2 Vols. EPSC. Evangelical Press, 2000.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.9 5
This commentary, on the text of Exodus, has been written for the building up of the church, It not only provides insights into the book of Exodus, but also clear and concise application. It is a book for everyone who wants to understand better what God says to us in his Word. The author writes, ‘It is my hope that pastors will use it for sermon preparation, and others for Bible study preparation and personal study. [Full Review]
Murphy, James G. A critical and exegetical commentary on the book of Exodus. T&T Clark, 1866.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.8 5
James Murphy was professor of Hebrew in Belfast and his commentary on Genesis is in the Barnes Notes set and much sought after. Spurgeon himself gave it top rating. [Full Review]
Pink, Arthur W. Gleanings in Exodus. Moody Publishers, 1981.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.7 5
This book is concerned with the theme of redemption in the Book of Exodus. It covers the need of redemption, the might of the Redeemer, the character of redemption, the duty of the redeemed, and the provisions made for failure. [Full Review]
Law, Henry. The Gospel In Exodus. Zondervan, 1855.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.7 5
It is the Christian contention that all of Scripture speaks of Jesus. In Christ Is All, Henry Law walks through the first five books of the Old Testament and shows how the books of Moses are a treasury of Christ. This classic devotional exposition, once published in 5 volumes, is now conveniently bound in one nicely re-typeset edition. [Full Review]
Legg, John. The King and His Kingdom: The Gospel of Matthew Simply Explained. WCS. Evangelical Press, 2004.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
5 5
The King and His Kingdom is a large commentary on the book of Matthew. In it, John Legg explores how Matthew helps God’s people seek first the kingdom of heaven. He explains how the gospel calls us to honor, trust, and serve Jesus Christ as the King and the practical lessons this has for us. Equipped with over forty years of ministry experience, Legg explains the Gospel of Matthew simply and clearly. [Full Review]
Boice, James Montgomery. The Gospel of Matthew: Volume 1 The King and His Kingdom: Chapters 1-7. JMB. Baker Books, 2006.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.9 5
One of Boice’s most compelling works, his exposition of Matthew integrates rigorous scholarship and clear communication with a lucid verse-by-verse explanation and application to today’s world. Intensely Jewish and evangelistic, the Gospel focuses on Christ as the king who came, died, rose—and will return again! 688 pages total, two softcovers from Baker. [Full Review]
Carson, Donald A. “Matthew” in Matthew, Mark, Luke. EBC. Zondervan, 1984.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.7 5
This award-winning commentary, now available in softcover, includes the full text of the NIV and details scholarly, technical notes and discussions, which provide insights to the Scriptures that are practical to everyday life. [Full Review]
Lloyd-Jones, D. Martin. Studies in the Sermon on the Mount. MLJ. Inter-Varsity Press, 1976.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
5 5
A spiritual classic, this detailed and comprehensive study by one of the greatest expository preachers of our time explains Christ’s teaching in the Sermon on the Mount and incisively applies it to the Christian life. With characteristic vigor and emotional vitality Dr. Lloyd-Jones presents a brilliant and detailed exposition of one of the best known but most frequently misunderstood passages of Scripture. Here is a comprehensive and exhaustive study of our Lord’s words as recorded in Matthew chapter five. This beautiful portion of the Sermon on the Mount is carefully analysed, its contents outlined and thoughtfully arranged, and vastly rich and abundant truths are gleaned for the reader’s spiritual nurture. [Full Review]
Hughes, R. Kent. Mark: Jesus, Servant and Savior. PtW. Crossway Books, 1989.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
5 5
The Preaching the Word Series is a set of commentaries on the New Testament written by R. Kent Hughes, pastor of College Church, Wheaton Illinois. This is the first of two volumes on the gospel of Mark. He begins with little in the way of introduction and jumps right into a running commentary on the text. Hughes draws out the meat of the gospel, focusing on the message and events. A good read for pastor and lay people. [Full Review]
Ferguson, Sinclair B. Let's Study Mark. Banner of Truth, 1999.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
4.8 5
When John Mark wrote out his “good news” about Jesus two thousand years ago, his Gospel was a completely new kind of book. No one had ever written one before. In fact no one would have known what a Gospel was…What made the Gospel of Mark unique was this: it was not written merely as the memoir of Jesus as a great man, not even as the greatest man who had ever lived. Rather it was meant to persuade its readers that Jesus was the Son of God…Who is Jesus of Nazareth? What is the good news (gospel) about him?…This book presents us with Mark’s answer. [Full Review]
Bock, Darrell L. Luke. 2 Vols. BECNT. Baker Academic, 1994.
Joel R. Beeke April 15, 2012
5 5
The gospel of Luke has much to say to us today. Our diversity can divide and destroy us and we are quick to fight for our individual identities as a culture. The book of Luke discusses these problems and prejudices through Jesus. The life of Jesus was God-breathed and made the disctinction between Jew and Gentile moot. Luke’s gospel’s central application is that God,through the incarnation of Jesus, can pull a fractious world together. Darrell Bock (Ph.D., University of Aberdeen) is professor of New Testament studies at Dallas Theological Seminary. He is coeditor of a contributor to Dispensationalism, Israel and the Church, and the author of a two-volume commentary on Luke. [Full Review]
Spurgeon, Charles H. The Treasury of David (in 3 volumes). Hendrickson Publishers, 1988.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
5 5
Charles Haddon Spurgeon, the “Prince of Preachers,” composed and polished The Treasury of David over the span of nearly half his ministry. This incomparable commentary and omnibus on the Psalms has been prized by Christians ever since. Spurgeon’s own commentary on every verse of the Psalms is extremely insightful, and by itself it quite rich. In The Treasury of David you will also find a wealth of illuminating extracts and quotes from hundreds of commentators, contemporaries of Spurgeon as well as the great Puritan expositors of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. Homiletical hints on almost every verse, concise sermon outlines, provocative seed thoughts as well as u seful bibliographies and an index of authors offer practical help for preaching and teaching. . Whether you are teaching on the Psalms, studying them for personal devotions, or simply intrigued by the writings of Spurgeon, you’ll enjoy this splendid classic. [Full Review]
Goldingay, John. Psalms (3 volume set). 3 Vols. BCOTWP. Baker Academic, 2008.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
5 5
The Book of Psalms is unrivaled in all of Scripture for its emotional intensity and spiritual intimacy. With a scholar’s eye and a pastor’s heart, Goldingay delves into the psalms, illuminating the literary, historical, and grammatical aspects of the text, while clarifying the theological implications. His careful reading is complemented by a detailed introduction.This is the third volume in the Baker Commentary on the Old Testament Wisdom and Psalms Series. The series is tailored to the distinctives of poetry and wisdom literature. [Full Review]
Dickson, David. Psalms. GEN. Banner of Truth, 1991.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.8 5
Reformed perspective. The value of this work by Dickson is that it is simply written and is a compact size. It is suggestive rather than exhaustive, and designed not for the deliberation of scholars but for the meditation of the saints. The emphasis is instructive and devotional. Written in older English style, like a KJV Bible. No Greek or Hebrew. KJV based. Mostly passage by passage format. David Dickson (1583-1662) was Professor of Philosophy and Divinity at the University of Glasgow. [Full Review]
Bridges, Charles. Proverbs. CCC. Crossway Books, 1846.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
5 5
In this 1846 writing, Charles Bridges asserts that Proverbs does not generally receive the esteem it should. Going verse by verse, Bridges gives homilectical and practical advice, rather than presenting a technical study. Charles Spurgeon referred to Bridge’s commentary as the best on Proverbs, saying, “Whilst explaining the passage in hand, he sets other portions of the word in new lights. [Full Review]
Waltke, Bruce K. The Book of Proverbs. 2 Vols. NICOT. Eerdmans, 2004.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
5 5
The embodiment of God’s wisdom for everyday living, the Book of Proverbs has been quoted by Jews, Christians, and Muslims for centuries. These maxims, born out of personal experience, are passed on from father to son, from teacher to student. They warn of manifold dangers to avoid, point out simple truths to be remembered. Anyone who follows these adages will evince a maturity beyond his years. Waltke, who has been researching the text for over 25 years, is fully abreast of the most recent archaeological, literary, and textual discoveries. His commentary is filled with penetrating details for scholars, yet it is his unpedantic style which will appeal to pastors and general readers. This mammoth study, one of the most comprehensive on the market, will retrieve from relative obscurity the wealth of Israel’s ethical treasure. [Full Review]
Brady, Gary. Heavenly Wisdom: Proverbs Simply Explained. WCS. Evangelical Press, 2003.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
5 5
Gary Brady comments on the book of Proverbs, showing how chapters 1-9 provide an introduction that instructs one on the proper use of the proverbs found throughout the remainder of the book. He goes beyond making moral and common sense observations on the text, pressing to see how even Proverbs speaks of Christ. This is an engaging, devotional, and practical commentary; Proverbs is simply explained. [Full Review]
Kitchen, John. Proverbs. MOT. Christian Focus Publications, 2006.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.7 5
Advances in technology have dramatically transformed how we live, learn, and labor, but have they made us any godlier or more discerning? Kitchen balances scholarly research and pastoral admonition as he connects the message of Proverbs with other passages of Scripture. The result is practical application for 21st-century readers in pursuit of wisdom in everyday life. 790 pages, hardcover from Christian Focus. [Full Review]
Arnot, William. Studies in Proverbs: Laws from Heaven for Life on Earth. Kregel Classics, 1978.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.7 5
William Arnot (1808-1875) guides readers through various topics and illustrates the spiritual significance of the Proverbs. Working through the book of Proverbs section by section, Arnot offers practical instruction and direction in living a Christ-centered life. [Full Review]
Lloyd-Jones, D. Martin. Authentic Christianity: Acts. 6 Vols. MLJ. Banner of Truth, 2006.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
5 5
Bold preaching, saved souls, dramatic missionary journeys, the coming of the Holy Spirit—the Book of Acts is bursting with colorful, history-changing events! In this powerful series, one of the 20th century’s greatest preachers offers a captivating verse-by-verse exposition that will encourage, challenge, and strengthen you in your faith. Approx. 300 pages each, six hardcovers from Crossway. [Full Review]
Keddie, Gordon J. You Are My Witnesses, The message of the Acts of the Apostles. WCS. Evangelical Press, 1994.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.9 5
Acts is first and foremost the history of the work of the Holy Spirit in the church. It brings together two great promises of “another Counsellor”, who would lead the disciples into all truth and the Great Commission to preach the gospel to the whole world in the assurance that he would be with them always, “to the very end of the age.” Acts is also the record of costly campaigning against a fiercely resistant enemy, over the eternal destiny of lost men and women. The sounds of battle echo from almost every scene. But so also does the scent of victory, as lives are changed and the light of Christ spreads from nation to nation! [Full Review]
Hughes, R. Kent. Acts: The Church Afire. PtW. Crossway Books, 2014.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.8 5
Hughes’s critically acclaimed series is known for its clear exposition, readability, and practical application. This installment details the growth of early Christianity with the spreading flame of the Holy Spirit. A great resource for pastors, lay leaders, and any student of the Bible. 368 pages, hardcover from Crossway Books. [Full Review]
Stott, John R. W. The Message of Acts: The Spirit, the Church, and the World. BST. Inter-Varsity Press, 1994.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.7 5
The Mesage of Acts by John R.W. Stott The Spirit moves the church into the world. That is how it has always been since the day of Pentecost when the Spirit brought thousands from many countries into the body of Christ. This book opens to us the early days of the church as recorded by Luke in the book of Acts. John Stott was rector of All Souls Church in London for twenty-five years and is an acclaimed and beloved author and commentator. [Full Review]
Hodge, Charles. Romans. CCC. Crossway Books, 1994.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
5 5
Charles Hodge, who for fifty-six years–from 1822 to 1878– lectured on the Pauline Epistles at Princeton Theological Seminary, issued the final version of his commentary on Ro- mans in 1864. It was at once recognized as belonging to the number of the few truly great works on this Epistle and that verdict has been upheld by Christian leaders down to the pre- sent day. Particularly noteworthy is the commendation which the work has received from the preachers of the gospel. [Full Review]
Shedd, William G.T. Commentary on Romans. MISSING PUB, 2007.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.9 5
First published in 1879, this classic Reformed Commentary has been reprinted again and again through the years. It is an outstanding contribution to the study of the Epistle that has turned the world upside-down. 442 Pages. Softcover from Solid Ground Christian Books. William Greenough Thayer Shedd (1820-1894) was both a congregational and, later, a Presbyterian pastor. He has a distinguished career as a Professor of English Literature prior to his work at the theological seminaries of Auburn, Andover, and finally at Union Seminary. [Full Review]
Moo, Douglas J. The Epistle to the Romans. NICNT. Eerdmans, 1996.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.8 5
Get a new perspective on Pauline theology with this volume in the NICNT. A significant revision of Douglas Moo’s work for the defunct Wycliffe series, it replaces Jon Murray’searlier work. Moo comments on the entire Epistle, interacting with the very latest scholarly discussions and repeatedly demonstrating the importance of historical context for exegesis. [Full Review]
Hughes, R. Kent. Romans: Righteousness from Heaven. PtW. Crossway Books, 1991.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.7 5
Justification by faith, abounding grace, freedom from sin, becoming a living sacrifice—Paul’s epistle to the Romans contains ideas that have challenged Christians since it was written. In this new commentary (fifth in the Preaching the Word series), Hughes offers clear exposition of the entire epistle along with practical applications. And don’t let the series title fool you—this commentary is excellent for teachers, study groups, and individuals too. About 350 pages, hardcover. [Full Review]
Brown, John. Analytical exposition of the Epistle of Paul, the apostle to the Romans. MISSING PUB, 2006.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.6 5
Dr. Brown was 73 when this work was issued in 1857. He had worked on it for forty years and tells us that during the year prior to its publication, ‘My principal occupation has been so to condense and remodel my work as to present in the fewest and plainest words what appears to me the true meaning and force of the… epistle.’ This work represents the most substantial available description of the apostle’s … [Full Review]
Stott, John R. W. The Message of Romans. BST. InterVarsity Press, 1994.
Joel R. Beeke May 4, 2012
4.6 5
When Paul first penned his letter to the house churches of Rome, his purpose was to gain prayerful support for his coming mission to the western reaches of the Mediterranean world. Little did he know that for two millennia this tautly tuned exposition of the gospel would echo through church and academy, market and home. Or that it would leap great oceans to reverberate through lands and hearts beyond the farthest edges of his world. John Stott, in this new paper edition previously released under the title Romans, joins a chorus of distinguished voices of the church who have pondered and lived the great themes of Romans, and who have tuned our ears to hear its rich harmonies and meditate on its broad vision. In the classic tradition of great Christian leaders who have commented on Romans, Stott expounds Paul’s words, themes and arguments. The power of the gospel, the righteousness of God revealed from heaven, is clearly addressed to today’s men and women who have answered its summons. Not only is Stott deeply acquainted with the text and context of Romans, he is also conversant with the most recent Pauline scholarship. But most important, he views Romans from his own pastoral and missionary perspective, an outlook shaped in turn by the great vision of the apostle. Here is a commentary spanning the two worlds of Romans–Paul’s and ours. [Full Review]