PastorTimothy72

PastorTimothy72

Libraries

Reviews

Duvall, J. Scott. Revelation. TTCS. Baker Books, 2014.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. If you are teaching/preaching through Revelation, I honestly think you will be hard pressed to find a more helpful resource than Duvall's commentary. No, it does not go into as great of depth as a number of commentaries you will find, but it makes Revelation manageable for just about anyone (and it does it in a straightforward verse-by-verse manner). The ideas for illustrating the text while teaching are quite good. Supplement this with Beale's shorter commentary offering on Revelation as well as Richard Bauckham's "The Theology of the Book of Revelation."
Yarbrough, Robert W. 1-3 John. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2008.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. Perhaps not as helpful in the areas of illustration and practical application as I typically like, the depth of insight that Yarbrough offers just proves stronger than other commentaries I have consulted on 1-3 John.
Reese, Ruth Anne. 2 Peter & Jude. THNTC. Eerdmans, 2007.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. I absolutely love Reese's contribution on 2nd Peter/Jude. Her commentary, while shorter than others on the two biblical books, is insightful and to the point. Her theological reflections section provides further depth and great thoughts for applying the texts. (For a single book on 1/2 Peter & Jude, I would refer you to Schreiner in the NAC series).
Jobes, Karen H. 1 Peter. BECNT. Baker Academic, 2005.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. While more on the technical side of things, Jobes' commentary will hold appeal to the preacher/teacher seeking a solid, exegetical understanding of 1 Peter, while also appealing some to the expositional side of things. (For both 1 and 2 Peter together, get Schreiner in the NAC series).
Hiebert, D. Edmond. James. BMH Books, 2002.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For me, by far the resource I have used most in my study and/or lessons on the book of James has been Hiebert's commentary. He provides incredibly rich depth of insight, and he does so in a clear manner that provides wonderful ideas for outlining and teaching the text. None better out there, in my opinion. Get this on James.
Johnson, Luke Timothy. Hebrews. NTL. Presbyterian Publishing, 2006.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. In one's study of Hebrews, Johnson's work is where I would recommend starting. It sides at times more on the academic side of the proverbial aisle, but that often proves helpful through a biblical book like Hebrews.
Kitchen, John A. The Pastoral Epistles for Pastors. Kress Christian Publications, 2009.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. I think the preacher/teacher will be hard pressed to find a more helpful, relevant commentary on the Pastoral Epistles than John Kitchen's work. It covers the necessary basis of a great commentary for me in its depth of exegetical insight along with practical application.
Stott, John R. W. The Message of Thessalonians. BST. InterVarsity Press, 1991.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For the preacher/teacher, Stott's commentary on 1/2 Thessalonians proves consistently to be the most helpful, in my opinion. The way that he outlines the material and speaks to the dominant thrust of Paul throughout the texts is outstanding.
Woodhouse, John. Colossians & Philemon: So Walk In Him. FB. Christian Focus Publications, 2011.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. My favorite commentary on Colossians/Philemon is definitely Woodhouse. I find that he deals with the theological depth of Colossians in a clear, concise manner and that he draws out some very strong application points along the way. Start here if teaching through these two letters from Paul, and consider augmenting it with James Dunn's contribution in the NIGTC series).
Hughes, R. Kent. Philippians: The Fellowship of the Gospel. PtW. Crossway, 2007.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. I struggle to recommend the best commentary for a preacher/teacher to have on Philippians, but Hughes once again proves to provide a solid, evangelical interpretation while offering thoughts for illustration as well as application. It is as good a starting place as any for a resource whenever teaching through Philippians. (I think Gerald Hawthorne's contribution in the Word Biblical Commentary series would be a good compliment resource to glean more in-depth theological content).
Hoehner, Harold W. Ephesians: An Exegetical Commentary. Baker Books, 2002.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. This is probably the heaviest of the commentaries I recommend as the best resource on a biblical book for the preacher/teacher. Nevertheless, I find Hoehner's work to be doctrinally and practically challenging and to be the commentary you want on your shelf if you could only have one for Ephesians. (If you could add a resource to accompany it, I highly recommend also getting Eugene Peterson's "Practice Resurrection.")
George, Timothy. Galatians. NAC. Broadman & Holman, 1994.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Galatians, for the preacher/teacher, I would suggest George's commentary as a very solid starting point. It takes historical context into consideration, provides theological insight, and incorporates thoughts from some notable thinkers. I find it easier to draw practical applications from his commentary than a number of others in the NAC series, as well.
Garland, David E. 2 Corinthians. NAC. Broadman & Holman, 1999.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. In one's study of 2 Corinthians, start with Garland. You may not agree with everything he says, but he will make you think. I find his observations insightful and fresh. (Also, add to your library Roy Clements' "The Strength of Weakness).
Vang, Preban. Strauss, Mark L.; Walton, John H. eds. 1 Corinthians. TTCS. Baker Books, 2014.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. I like several books in the Teach the Text series as resources to consult when teaching or preaching through all or sections of a biblical book. My first exposure to the series may have been Vang, and he did not disappoint. Accessible and applicable are the words I would use, and it stands out as a volume the preacher/teacher would benefit from on 1 Corinthians. If you can find a used copy, it is worth also owning the contribution by James Arthur Orr and William Walther in the Anchor Bible series.
Stott, John R. W. The Message of Romans. BST. InterVarsity Press, 1994.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. Stott's commentary on Romans is at times too brief on matters, but it is by the first commentary on Romans I ever consult. If you only had one, I would start with him. (Schreiner and Moo offer more "scholarly" works).
Hughes, R. Kent. Acts: The Church Afire. PtW. Crossway, 2014.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. My favorite Acts commentary is that by Hughes. It is clear and insightful and packed with great illustration and application ideas. I would say as an aside that you might want to augment his commentary with F.F. Bruce in the NICNT series.
Bruner, Frederick Dale. The Gospel of John: A Commentary. Eerdmans, 2011.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. I am torn here. Bruner is excellent on John, as he also is on Matthew. Sometimes, though, I feel like Bruner gets too fixated on a theological issue and gets bogged down with it. So I could easily say that Leon Morris' "Expositions on the Gospel of John" would get my top nod (note: this is not the NICNT Morris, but the Eerdman's edition). As a side note, you also will glean more literary reflections from Thomas Brodie's commentary, which is fairly expensive.
Hendriksen, William. Luke. HK. Baker Academic, 1978.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. As to Hendricksen, I disagree with the review that says it merely sights the obvious. It is perhaps my favorite volume in the set by Hendricksen and Kistemaker (and I would highly recommend the entire NT set). Mind you, I like Joel B. Green's contribution, and for preaching/teaching purposes I would also recommend Craddock in the Interpretation series. But I would start with Hendricksen.
Hughes, R. Kent. Mark: Jesus, Servant and Savior. PtW. Crossway, 1989.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. As to Mark, I absolutely love Hughes' two volumes. Yes, they are sermonic in nature and not at all technical, but they are insightful, engaging, and helpful. If you wanted to augment it with something a bit more academic, consider Strauss in the Zondervan Exegetical series.
Bruner, Frederick Dale. Matthew: The Christbook and the Churchbook. 2 Vols. Eerdmans, 2004.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. As to Matthew, I do not actually believe it is even close: Bruner stands out to me. I highly recommend you get his two volumes. You may not always agree with him, but you will be challenged by him. (I named my second son after Dr. Knox Chamblin because of the character and wisdom of that man, so you cannot go wrong with his two volume set through Mentor).
Boice, James Montgomery. The Minor Prophets: Volume 2: Micah-Malachi. JMB. Baker Books, 2006.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion, so I end in my recommendation of Malachi with Boice). That said, where is Allen Ross' "Malachi: Then and Now" on this page? If you are teaching on Malachi, make sure you consult Ross' commentary.
Phillips, Richard D. Zechariah. REC. P&R Publishing, 2007.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For Zechariah, from the first page on, I was captivated by Phillips' insights in his commentary. Sermonic in nature, you might want to augment his contribution with someone like "God Remembers" by Charles Feinberg, but you will especially appreciate the ideas for illustration and application that you will draw out from Phillips. (Note: Feinberg's dispensational views will come out in his commentary. Even though I do not fall into his theological camp in this regard, I value highly his knowledge and insights).
Taylor, Richard A.; Clendenen, E. Ray. Haggai and Malachi. NAC. Broadman & Holman, 2004.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). Boice on Haggai is definitely indispensable, in my opinion, but Taylor in the NAC is remarkably thorough and helpful -- and Clendenen on Malachi is also quite good.
Webber, Daniel. The Coming of the Warrior-King: Zephaniah Simply Explained. WCS. Evangelical Press, 2004.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). While brief, Webber's commentary on Zephaniah packs a large punch through its limited pages. It is the commentary for Zephaniah that I would recommend finds its way on each pastor's bookshelf. It is helpful in providing titles and outlines for messages, offers a sound interpretation of the text, and proves accessible for anyone.
Bruckner, James. Jonah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah. NIVAC. Zondervan, 2004.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). I am giving Bruckner the nod on Habakkuk on this site primarily because I did not see John Currid's work with Welwyn's Commentaries listed. I find Currid to be a straight forward and helpful even if a bit too brief at times. In the spirit of Currid, Bruckner is also accessible and practical. (I recommended Richard Patterson from Wycliffe series for Nahum: he is good re: Habakkuk and Zephaniah, too).
Patterson, Richard D. Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah. WEC. Moody Publishers, 1991.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For Nahum specifically, for the preacher/teacher I would refer you to Patterson. Yes, he deals a bit more with Hebrew and linguistic issues, but I think he does so in a way that even someone not familiar with Hebrew can understand. His entire commentary is noteworthy and worth having (James Bruckner in the NIVAC is not as technical; O. Palmer Robertson is comparable to Patterson - so it will come down to an individual's preference of style here).
Dempster, Stephen G. Micah. THOTC. Eerdmans, 2017.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For Micah specifically, for the preacher/teacher I would suggest grabbing a copy of Dempster's contribution in the 'Two Horizons' series. The commentary section is not remotely as detailed as Waltke's work (which is definitely noteworthy in itself), but the theological reflection section at the end is remarkably helpful. This commentary will help teachers and preachers to draw out significant points of application for contemporary contexts.
Sasson, Jack M. Jonah. AYB. Yale University Press, 1990.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For the preacher/teacher on Jonah specifically, I would recommend Sasson. While I agree with one reviewer that this is at times overly technical and not as easy to navigate as other commentaries (that is true of the Anchor Bible series as a whole), if you mine for treasures in Sasson I think you are apt to find them. Yes, it takes a bit more digging, so to speak, but his commentary is worth the effort in my opinion. So while this is the one commentary I would recommend for the pastor's library, it would still actually come in second to Eugene Peterson's book "Under the Unpredictable Plant" (everyone in ministry should own it).
Busenitz, Irvin A. Joel and Obadiah: A Mentor Commentary. Ment. Mentor, 2002.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For Obadiah specifically, for the preacher/teacher, I gravitate toward Busenitz. He provides a strong balance between some technical or scholarly insights that prove helpful while drawing out appropriate points for application as well.
Smith, Gary V. Amos: A Mentor Commentary. Ment. Mentor, 2015.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For the book of Amos specifically, I appreciate the depth of insight both academically and practically that Smith offers in this his stand-alone commentary on Amos. (I am also a fan of J. Alec Motyer's commentary in the Bible Speaks Today series, but Smith provides more depth overall).
Robertson, O. Palmer. Prophet of the Coming Day, The message of Joel. WCS. Evangelical Press, 1996.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For Joel on its own, I would take Robertson. No, it is not remotely technical or academic, but it is engaging and practical. Therefore, as a preaching and teaching resource, I believe it proves most accessible.
Chester, Tim. Hosea: The Passion of God. FB. Christian Focus Publications, 2014.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). As to Hosea itself, I like Chester. Honestly, part of that extends from the fact that I personally enjoy the way Chester writes in general. In my estimation, for instance, the best book in the solid 'God's Word for You Series' is Chester on Exodus. He is solid in his interpretation and in his ability to connect God's Word to people's lives. This definitely proves true in his commentary on Hosea, which serves as my favorite resource on that prophetic book.
Ferguson, Sinclair B. Daniel. TPC. Thomas Nelson, 2002.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Daniel, for the preacher/teacher, Ferguson's commentary on Daniel is a can't miss. Certainly, one's eschatological views might determine what commentary he/she prefers on Daniel, but all things considered Ferguson helps individuals to grasp the big picture of Daniel as well as any contribution I have come across. If you could only have one commentary on Daniel in your library, choose Ferguson.
Thomas, Derek W. H. God Strengthens: Ezekiel Simply Explained. WCS. Evangelical Press, 1993.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Ezekiel, for the preacher/teacher, I think Thomas makes this difficult book the most accessible of any other contribution out there. This is certainly what one would consider to be an introductory level or mid-level commentary, so it will not go as in-depth as someone would need in studying Ezekiel, but it is my favorite. (I would suggest individuals also consulting the following to see which appeals to them: Duguid in NIVAC, Wright in Bible Speaks Today, and Greenberg's 2 volumes in Anchor Bible).
Brooks, Richard. Great Is Your Faithfulness, Lamentations simply explained. WCS. Evangelical Press, 1989.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Lamentations, for preachers/teachers, I would choose Brooks' contribution. It sets the context and deals with the background that a preacher/teacher needs while also making Lamentations as relevant to people's lives as well as any work on Lamentations I have personally encountered. (A good second choice is F.B. Huey's work on Jeremiah/Lamentations in the NAC series).
Thompson, John A. The Book of Jeremiah. NICOT. Eerdmans, 1980.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Jeremiah, for preachers/teachers, I lean toward Thompson's contribution. As I mentioned in my recommendation of Craigie for Deuteronomy, I am not always a fan of the NICOT series, but I think Thompson to be more readable than some of the others in the series while engaging with the text in as a through a manner as the student of Jeremiah honestly needs. Thompson serves as my go-to commentary for Jeremiah; if you only had one in your pastoral library on this biblical book, I think he would serve your needs well. (Note: It is totally worth your investment to get and read Eugene Peterson's book "Run with the Horses" before doing a series through Jeremiah).
Oswalt, John N. Isaiah. NIVAC. Zondervan, 2003.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Isaiah, for the preacher/teacher, I am a big fan of Oswalt's NIVAC commentary. In fairness, I neither have nor have I consulted with Oswalt's more extensive and academic NICOT edition, but his NIVAC contribution provides strong contextual insights along with wonderful points for relevant, contemporary application. In a field of several really good commentaries on Isaiah, this is the one I would recommend if you could only have 'one' in your pastoral library.
Gledhill, Tom. The Message of the Song of Songs. BST. InterVarsity Press, 1994.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Song of Songs, for the preacher/teacher, I lean toward Gledhill. Scholars and the like read Song of Songs in various ways and so it is not a bad idea to find a few different commentaries on this biblical book, but Gledhill's penchant for poetry and ability to draw out relevant application points make it my choice as the one commentary to add if you only had one on Song of Songs. (I am also a big fan of the not well known "A Song for Lovers," by Craig Glickman - paperback, 1976 edition)
Bartholomew, Craig G. Ecclesiastes. BCOT. Baker Academic, 2009.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Ecclesiastes, for the preacher/teacher, I give Bartholomew the edge. I would point people to "Living Life Backward" by David Gibson, Iain Provan's contribution in the NIVAC series, and William Brown in the Interpretation series, as well. Yet, overall, I think Bartholomew's fresh and full engagement with the text of Ecclesiastes makes it the go-to commentary for me.
Kitchen, John A. Proverbs: A Mentor Commentary. Ment. Christian Focus Publications, 2012.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Proverbs, for the preacher/teacher, I do not think it is even close honestly - get Kitchen! He covers the book of Proverbs thoroughly and makes wonderful connections to our lives. If you only had one book on Proverbs in your library, it needs to be this one. (Waltke now has a shorter version on Proverbs than his two volume NICOT contribution that is worth adding, but I still prefer Kitchen).
Spurgeon, Charles H. The Treasury of David (in 3 volumes). Hendrickson Publishers, 1988.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Psalms, for the preacher/teacher, I still think the go-to commentary is Spurgeon's contribution. It is not the easiest to navigate at times, it can be a bit dated, and at least in my three volume set the print is a bit smaller than I would like, but it is remarkably rich in the scope of its insights. I have not found any other commentaries on Psalms that rival it. (C. Hassell Bullock's two volumes in the "Teach the Text" series will prove helpful for illustrating and applying the Psalms, too).
Ash, Christopher. Hughes, R. Kent. ed. Job: The Wisdom of the Cross. PtW. Crossway, 2014.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Job, for the preacher/teacher, I would suggest Ash from 'The Preaching the Word' series. It is not academic or technical at all, but it is insightful and Christ-honoring and makes sense of the overall message of the book. (If you can find the little book by Robert Fyall, "How Does God Treat His Friends," you should definitely get it as well).
Jobes, Karen H. Esther. NIVAC. Zondervan, 1999.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Esther, for the preacher/teacher, it is hard to beat Karen Jobes' contribution. She explains the text remarkably well and bridges its message to a contemporary context. If you only could have one commentary on Esther in your library, pick this one up.
Thomas, Derek W. H. Ezra and Nehemiah. REC. P&R Publishing, 2016.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Ezra & Nehemiah, for the preacher/teacher, Thomas is a must have. You will find a wealth of insights in Thomas to drive points of illustration and application as you preach or teach through Ezra & Nehemiah that other commentaries do not provide on these two books. (I do recommend, however, that you get Charles Fensham in the NICOT series to augment Thomas. On a few points, Fensham I think offers a stronger interpretation).
Allen, Leslie C. 1 & 2 Chronicles. TPC. Thomas Nelson, 2002.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For 1 & 2 Chronicles, for the preacher/teacher, I would point you to Allen's contribution. This commentary is definitely not academic or technical in nature, but it makes Chronicles remarkably accessible to all persons. In preaching or teaching through 1 and 2 Chronicles, this would become a "go-to" resource for you. I recommend it highly!
Leithart, Peter J. 1 and 2 Kings. BTC. Brazos Press, 2006.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For 1 & 2 Kings, for the preacher/teacher, I would point you to Leithart. This is neither a technical treatment of Kings nor is it a verse-by-verse treatment, but it is beautiful written and Christ-honoring. I personally consider this to be an enjoyable and engaging read in and of itself. (For a more extensive look at 1 and 2 Kings, albeit sermonic in nature, Philip Graham Ryken has a good two volume set in the Reformed Expository Commentary set that you could also consider adding).
Davis, Dale Ralph. 2 Samuel: Out of Every Adversity. FB. Christian Focus Publications, 1999.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For 1 Samuel (and 2 Samuel), for the preacher/teacher, Dr. Davis' wins out. His is not a verse-by-verse treatment and he does not deal with all the technical issues you might find in some other commentaries, but he engages the heart and the mind in an uncanny way with biblical and theological accuracy. I could not recommend his contribution on 1 and 2 Samuel any higher. (It is also worth considering getting Peter Leithart's "A Son to Me" for a different voice).
Davis, Dale Ralph. 1 Samuel: Looking on the Heart. FB. Christian Focus Publications, 2000.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For 1 Samuel (and 2 Samuel), for the preacher/teacher, Dr. Davis' wins out. His is not a verse-by-verse treatment and he does not deal with all the technical issues you might find in some other commentaries, but he engages the heart and the mind in an uncanny way with biblical and theological accuracy. I could not recommend his contribution on 1 and 2 Samuel any higher. (It is also worth considering getting Peter Leithart's "A Son to Me" for a different voice).
Chisholm Jr., Robert B. A Commentary on Judges and Ruth. KEL. Kregel Academic, 2013.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Ruth, for the preacher/teacher, I would point you to Chisholm. (I agree with his perspective on several issues more so than I do Daniel Block, although I would perhaps advise preachers/teachers to try to have both books in their library). Chisholm is lucid and balanced in his approach to the book of Ruth, and he proved to be the most helpful overall in my personal study through Ruth. That said, a resource that I also found invaluable was "A Sweet and Bitter Providence," by John Piper.
Jordan, James B. Judges: Gods War Against Humanism. Geneva Press, 1985.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Judges, for the preacher/teacher, I highly encourage you to invest in Jordan's work on Judges. You might not agree with him on everything, but you will find yourself engaged by his ideas and thoughts. He offers perspective that you will be hard pressed to find in other commentaries on Judges. He does an excellent job, too, of connecting passages from Judges with the full counsel of God's Word. (You might want to supplement Jordan with Dale Ralph Davis, Robert Chisholm, or Daniel Block)
Davis, Dale Ralph. Joshua: No Falling Words. FB. Christian Focus Publications, 2000.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Joshua, for the preacher/teacher, it is not really even close - get Davis! The commentary is not going to take you verse by verse, and it definitely is not concerned with "higher criticism, etc." But it explains Joshua remarkably well, while also illustrating and applying the text. It also doesn't hurt that it reads like good literature. (I would recommend David Howard in the NAC series as a good supplemental work to Davis).
Craigie, Peter C. The Book of Deuteronomy. NICOT. Eerdmans, 1976.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Deuteronomy, for the preacher/teacher, I would give Craigie the nod. For the record, I am not the biggest fan of the NICOT series (I like Wenham on Leviticus, Fensham on Ezra/Nehemiah, Thompson on Jeremiah, O. Palmer Robertson on Nahum/Habakkuk/Zephaniah), but Craigie writes in a way that you can read him clearly while dealing with and yet not getting bogged down in critical or technical matters. Not a commentary that will offer as much in the way of application or illustration, but it engages the preacher/teacher with the content one needs in studying Deuteronomy. If the pastor only had one commentary on Deuteronomy, I would recommend Craigie (for a different voice, consider also Brueggemann, Abingdon OT Commentary)
Duguid, Iain M. Numbers: God's Presence in the Wilderness. PtW. Crossway, 2006.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Numbers, for the preacher/teacher, Duguid's work gets my nod. Yes, his commentary is sermonic in nature, but it is accessible and enjoyable to read. What you do not get in way of depth re: Hebrew word studies or critical analysis, you do get in relevance and application for biblical teaching. (I like John Currid's work here, too). If you only had one commentary on Numbers in a "pastor's library," get Duguid.
Ross, Allen P. Holiness to the Lord: A Guide to the Exposition of the Book of Leviticus. MISSING PUB, 2006.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Genesis, for the preacher/teacher, "Holiness to the Lord" by Ross is the one I would single out. (For me, Tidball is a close second, but Ross goes more in depth overall). Ross' writing is easy to follow, he connects many of his insights to the full counsel of God's Word, and he offers a number of relevant application points. If you are a preacher who can have only one commentary on Leviticus, get this one.
Ryken, Philip Graham. Exodus: Saved for God's Glory. PtW. Crossway, 2005.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Exodus, for the preacher/teacher, Ryken on Exodus is definitely the best out there. It matters not that his commentary is sermonic in nature because Ryken's research on the book of Exodus is thorough and remarkably insightful. I like Enns, Stuart, Hamilton, and Motyer, but none of them are nearly as detailed, illustrative, or applicable as Ryken. If you are a preacher who can have only one commentary on Exodus, get this one.
Boice, James Montgomery. Genesis. 3 Vols. JMB. Baker Books, 2006.
PastorTimothy72 PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. For Genesis, for the preacher/teacher, Boice's 3 volumes on Genesis is definitely the best out there. It matters not that his commentary is sermonic in nature because Boice tackles all the most significant issues in a theologically rich way and in a way that connects to the hearts and minds of readers. If you are a preacher who can have only one commentary on Genesis, get this one.