BRathbun

BRathbun

Reviews

Belcher Jr., Richard P. Finding Favour in the Sight of God: A Theology of Wisdom Literature. NSBT. IVP Academic, 2018.
BRathbun BRathbun September 18, 2021
Very nice to have read once. Not one I kept, but so helpful considering there is not much that is helpful for the books usually labeled 'wisdom' books. I concur with the previous reviewer, very good on Proverbs and Job, ehhhh on Ecclesiastes. Glad to have read it and gleaned from it.
Schreiner, Thomas R. Magnifying God in Christ: A Summary of New Testament Theology. Baker Academic, 2010.
BRathbun BRathbun August 5, 2021
What a great distillation of the main focus of the NT. Hard to think of an important idea that didn't get touched on and he even addressed some important interpretive issues in NT scholarship today with conservative judgments and sparkling clarity. Would make a great gift for anyone either starting out in deeper study of the bible or even for the seasoned reader who delights in God's truth. I found my self delighting in God all throughout it. Hard to think of anything to disagree with in this magnificent setting forth of the NT theology, which Schreiner sees as the fulfillment of the OT.
Gordon, T. David. Why Johnny Can't Preach: The Media Have Shaped the Messengers. P&R Publishing, 2009.
BRathbun BRathbun June 5, 2021
Good preaching should not only be textual, but should exemplify how to properly read a text. Most if not all the local preachers I listen not only dont portray these qualities, but it's to tell if they have spent much thought on reading the text at all themselves. Did not Jesus save some of his most pointed and scathing remarks for those who didn't read the Scriptures properly? The Sadducees, the scribes and pharisees. The disciples in Lk 24 were said to be foolish ones and slow to believe and had to taught through Jesus preaching where he could be found in the Scriptures. This book touches on this topic and others. As small and accessible and helpful as this book is, it should be read widely. Buy one for your pastor.
Harvey, Robert; Towner, Philip H. 2 Peter & Jude. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 2005.
BRathbun BRathbun May 8, 2021
Towner-Jude: Pleasantly surprised by this one. Clear introductory piece. Most emphasized the most important idea I learned from this reading of Jude, that is, its missional aspect. Towner's closing comment on verse 23: "Jude reveals the secret that is surely most in need of discovery throughout the church today: that Christians must find the way to be the presence of the suffering and forgiving Christ in the church and in the world far before they don the robes of the judging Lord of the eschaton."
Schreiner, Thomas R. 1, 2 Peter, Jude. NAC. Broadman & Holman, 2003.
BRathbun BRathbun May 8, 2021
For 1 Peter and Jude, Schreiner was so helpful(haven't read 2 Pet.). When I felt as if the majority were wrong, he'd usually be a great corrective. Although sometimes he would leave the good consensus behind too. Would rate Davids slightly better on 1 Pet., but I think I would give the nod to Schreiner over Davids on Jude. Both are excellent, but I was lost on Davids position on Judes use of 1 Enoch as an authoritative document and praying in the Holy Spiirt as referring to tongues. Schreiner is so valuable on any commentary he writes. His clarity, charity and theological rigor is admirable and to be imitated in my opinion. Some commentaries I know I can get rid of after I've read them, Schreiner is not one of those. Get it and enjoy.
Sanders, Fred. The Triune God. NSD. Zondervan, 2016.
BRathbun BRathbun April 5, 2021
If you are planning to teach or to write on the Trinity, then this is a must read. If you are looking to multiple books to study on the Trinity, make this one of them. The author emphasizes the process of the development of the doctrine of the Trinity from revelation, for which I am very thankful. Historical development and tradition are not absent, but are not the primary focus. This is certainly not a book for the beginner, but for those who have a introductory knowledge of the doctrine already: pick this up and read. Much wisdom will be gained by it.
Seifrid, Mark A. Christ, Our Righteousness: Paul's Theology of Justification. NSBT. IVP Academic, 2001.
BRathbun BRathbun January 24, 2021
Honestly, I wasn't too impressed with this book, but perhaps it just wasn't meant for me. I feel like I'm pretty aware of the discussion on justification and the NPP but I couldn't track with Seifred at all. Hard to get into maybe. When he made application, I usually found it thought provoking and sometimes profound. If you are deeply entrenched in the Pauline debates today, then this is probably right up your alley. Otherwise, probably pass for another. Very technical.
Ware, Bruce A. Father, Son, and Holy Spirit: Relationships, Roles, and Relevance. Crossway, 2005.
BRathbun BRathbun January 24, 2021
I read this book on a vacation to the lake and it's appeal lies in its clarity and devotional character. I enjoyed although looking back some of the conclusions & applications he was making could make one uneasy. There are too many others that are go-to's on the trinity today at an understandable level. Swain, Letham, Sanders. Matthew Barrett has a good one coming out soon. Ware is just too funny on too many theological issues. Atonement, Doctrine of God, etc.
Morales, L. Michael. Exodus Old and New: A Biblical Theology of Redemption. ESBT. IVP Academic, 2020.
BRathbun BRathbun January 24, 2021
Fantastic, one of my favorite reads in the past year. So thought stimulating and detailed. Explores the historical exodus drawing on multiple separate subjects into each chapter, then part two develops the 'second' or 'greater' exodus alluded to in the prophets, then part 3 moves into the gospels. Fascinating, every one able to should read and perhaps read again...
Hill, Andrew E.; Walton, John H. Old Testament Today: A Journey from Original Meaning to Contemporary Significance. Zondervan, 2004.
BRathbun BRathbun January 24, 2021
Pretty good. I learned from it and like having it around for some of the content, but just as much, if not more, for some of the charts and pictures. Lol. Honestly, before I could recommend this to someone, I would want them to read another intro work on the relationship between scripture and ANE texts. I would certainly want someone to be familiar with Walton's unorthodox views on early Genesis too(Creation & Adam), although I don't remember them showing up in this work per say.
Beale, G. K.; Campbell, David. Revelation: A Shorter Commentary. Eerdmans, 2015.
BRathbun BRathbun January 18, 2021
I have already learned and benefited so much from Greg Beale. Just add this to it. One of the best Christmas gifts ever. Read anything and everything by Beale if you can. This commentary is special. Not only is it more elaborate, accurate and conservative than most commentaries, but it hits home with our contemporary setting and into future all the way through with the 'Q's for reflection' sections. Greg Beale is the guide right now through Revelation. From what I understand, this commentary is the shorter (540) version of his larger (1300) commentary, leaving out discussions of the Greek and other interpreters views.
Beasley-Murray, George R. Book of Revelation. NCB. Eerdmans, 1981.
BRathbun BRathbun January 18, 2021
This is an important book in my opinion. Not just another commentary among many but one that should still be worked through. Surprised to see no reviews here, so it gets a 5. Beasley-Murray is no stranger to Johannine writings, very familiar with non-canonical Jewish writings and was a reputable Baptist scholar who wrote some very good works. This is among them. His knowledge of secondary Jewish literature shines in this volume. Best I've read thus far behind Beale's shorter commentary(561 pages).
Johnson, Alan F. “Revelation” in Hebrews through Revelation. EBC. Zondervan, 1982.
BRathbun BRathbun January 18, 2021
Pre-millenial. I bought this book for the commentary on Hebrews by Leon Morris, but I must say I'm glad to have read Alan Johnson on Revelation. He was the only one I read that consistently referred to the early church fathers views. As well, I often appreciated his conciseness, candidness and clarity. I now look forward to reading his 1 Cor. commentary I have. Great for the intro level reader. Right at 200 pages
Michaels, J. Ramsey. Revelation. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1997.
BRathbun BRathbun January 18, 2021
Premillenial, not terrible but certainly my least favorite of the five I read together. Found myself scratching my head at some conclusions and he does all but explicitly affirm annihilationism, saying "it can't be ruled out" in 20:11-15, completely ignoring 20:10, that those in the lake of fire "will be tormented day and night forever and ever". Takes issue with gender-exclusive language in ch. 21 despite it being the clear rendering of the Greek. Again, I don't regret having read it, actually his comments on the epilogue were among the best, but would certainly recommend either Morris (TNTC) or A.Johnson (EBC) first for the easiest intro commentary. One thing I must say for this commentary and the series, is that I truly appreciate the attempt to match attitudes with meaning of passages. Far too many 'cold facts' commentaries today.
Morris, Leon. Revelation. TNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1987.
BRathbun BRathbun January 18, 2021
Leon Morris was the man! Read anything you find by him. This commentary is brief no doubt and a bit dated now, but I have recently given a copy out to one interested in a short commentary on Revelation. One simply needs some reliable guides to begin to learn from revelation and Morris is a bible guy. For the introductory reader who wants something to go along with devotional reading, grab this from a used bookstore. Look up the OT references he gives and have a nice bible study.
Steinmann, Andrew E. Genesis. TOTC. IVP Academic, 2019.
BRathbun BRathbun January 9, 2021
Sparkling clarity and pleasant conclusions! I couldn't be happier with this update to Kidner's very brief commentary. Conservative/traditional views on creation and Adam, and always a eye toward relevant future revelation and developing themes which is crucial for valuing the importance Genesis has towards understanding scripture as a whole.
Tripp, Paul David. Dangerous Calling: Confronting The Unique Challenges Of Pastoral Ministry. IVP Books, 2012.
BRathbun BRathbun December 18, 2020
Reading this book is like having open heart surgery awake. All men should read this book
Beasley-Murray, George R. Baptism in the New Testament. BTCL. Paternoster Press, 1997.
BRathbun BRathbun December 18, 2020
What a good scholarly book. As a baptist himself, Beasley-Murray wrote a challenging book to Baptists. It is one of the best books I've read on the issue although I wouldn't agree with some of lengths he goes too. I've come to enjoy more of his writing since.
Beale, G. K.; Block, Daniel I.; Ferguson, Sinclair B.; Mohler Jr., R. Albert; Moo, Douglas J.; Packer, J. I.; Yarbrough, Robert W. Morgan, Christopher W.; Peterson, Robert A. eds. Hell Under Fire: Modern Scholarship Reinvents Eternal Punishment. Zondervan, 2004.
BRathbun BRathbun December 18, 2020
A bit repetitive but that is the nature of the volume as they combat the various false views on hell. By the same editors of the theology in community volumes and covers the same ground with the same great lineup of top-notch exegetes and theologians. Probably the best book on hell. Daniel Block's chapter on hell stood out as unique in this volume and was so insightful.
Dempster, Stephen G. Dominion and Dynasty: A Biblical Theology of the Hebrew Bible. NSBT. IVP Academic, 2003.
BRathbun BRathbun December 18, 2020
Fantastic. Perhaps I should rate more books at 4 so you know this one is a 5. Everyone should read this book. Dempster shows the unity of the OT by developing the theology of the TaNaKh, that is, the order of Jesus' bible(the Law, the Prophets and the Psalms/Writings). If nobody has brought the OT to life for you through the biblical theological model, tracing main themes, you can start here.
Goldsworthy, Greame. The Goldsworthy Trilogy. Paternoster Press, 2000.
BRathbun BRathbun December 18, 2020
Goldsworthy is the man. The book on the kingdom of God is so easy to read, simple yet profound insights within. Gospel and Wisdom a bit harder but even more insightful. The wisdom lit. in the OT is notoriously difficult to find biblical theology books on, especially as it relates to Christ. Goldsworthy covers alot of ground here.
Vos, Geerhardus. Biblical Theology: Old and New Testaments. Banner of Truth, 2014.
BRathbun BRathbun December 18, 2020
A good, but difficult read. Insightful in some tough areas in theology. One would want it in the library, especially if biblical theology is an interest.
Davids, Peter H. The First Epistle of Peter. NICNT. Eerdmans, 1990.
BRathbun BRathbun October 6, 2020
Davids commentary is marked by precision. I found this commentary correcting me far more often than the others that I used as far as details and focus of the text. Davids is very familiar with Judaism and it's character as pertains to NT writings and is an expert on the Catholic epistles. Very much enjoyed his excursus on suffering in 1Peter and the NT. One will want this if available for teaching and preaching.
Grudem, Wayne. 1 Peter. TNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1988.
BRathbun BRathbun October 5, 2020
What a great piece. Excels in common sense which is valued very much by this viewer, much more than the speculative and theoretical. Found that reading this after doing my own work often furthered and clarified my own thought. Thourough discussions of tough texts. Really should be the go-to for introductory readers along with Marshall's from the IVPNTC series.
DeRouchie, Jason S. How to Understand and Apply the Old Testament: Twelve Steps from Exegesis to Theology. P&R Publishing, 2017.
BRathbun BRathbun June 4, 2020
Magnificent! Answered so many questions on a how to approach the OT as Christian scripture. If one is interested in OT studies, don't dance around DeRouchie, go to him first! The last chapter on practical theology alone was worth the price.
Robertson, O. Palmer. The Christ of the Covenants. P&R Publishing, 1981.
BRathbun BRathbun April 11, 2020
Among the works described as essential for OT studies. Does nicely show the emphasis as well as the unity and diversity of each covenant. Typically, I find OT scholars treatment of the NT to be at times rather odd, but not so with Robertson. Especially taking into account the age of the book. Was a big help understanding covenant better as well as provoking some further thought on biblical theology.
Bruce, F. F.; Payne, David F. Israel and the Nations: The History of Israel from the Exodus to the Fall of the Second Temple. InterVarsity Press, 1998.
BRathbun BRathbun March 23, 2020
Everything F.F. Bruce writes is worth reading. This is a great intro to OT history and a great compliment to his NT history. Spans from the Exodus to 70 a.d. With that being said, really only half the book is background to the biblical portion of the OT(100 pages). Will be looking for a lengthier treatment.
Winter, Bruce W. After Paul Left Corinth: The Influence of Secular Ethics and Social Change. Eerdmans, 2001.
BRathbun BRathbun March 23, 2020
Essential reading for any serious study on Corinthians. Winter sets the bar high for interdisciplinary studies. Vastly expand your knowledge of 1st century Corinth.
Yarbrough, Robert W. The Letters to Timothy and Titus. PNTC. Eerdmans, 2018.
BRathbun BRathbun February 23, 2020
There are 1,978 footnotes in this commentary for those who are interested on such things. I told my wife this is the important type of study that goes on for the church. I have a feeling that this commentary will receive low ratings for a number of reasons, like traditional authorship and gender roles, of which I hope to see more of honestly. Those who have a love of novelty will probably not appreciate this volume, but it is truly refreshing. Very little speculation and focuses closely on what is actually said. Excels in word study, but never out of mind to the sentence and context at large. Focus on theology over the typical pros and cons of authorship issues that typically overwhelm a work on the three letters to Timothy and Titus. At about 600 pages, there was alot to chew on that was remarkably easy on the reader. With a couple of good intro commemtaries, I can't see myself looking for another except perhaps a biblical theological approach such as Kostenberger or definitely Beale's when it comes out.
Alexander, T. Desmond. From Paradise to the Promised Land: An Introduction to the Pentateuch. Baker Academic, 2002.
BRathbun BRathbun February 1, 2020
Decided to read this before studying through the book of Hebrews. It was a very good decision I believe. The first part of the book traces the development and current state of Pentatuechal criticism, critiquing it from a conservative scholarly standpoint. One would be much wiser for wading through this. Part two, the original book traces key themes through the Pentatuech from a biblical theological standpoint. His discussions are never dull, for example, I especially liked his discussion of Leviticus. His chapter on the Covenant at Sinai could well have been my favorite chapter. He has a knack for taking these sometimes neglected portions of scripture for repetition and dullness and giving them a fresh hearing. Part of the way he does this is by ending each chapter with a discussion on how the theme connects to the NT. Highly recommend this book for anyone interested in biblical theology, studying in the Pentatuech or even just reading through the Pentatuech.
Green, Michael. 2 Peter and Jude. TNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1987.
BRathbun BRathbun January 16, 2020
4.5 Does much to show the unity of 1 and 2 Peter in the intro and commentary. Pleasantly heavy on already and not yet concepts. Full of witty, pithy, quotable statements, which I adore in any writing. Views neither letter as having priority, but a missing source, much like Q. I would have to say his commentary on 2 Peter was better than Jude. All of it was very good really, but as a reformed guy, and fan of Jude, if you botch the 'kept' concept, you've missed about 4 references out of 25 verses.
Marshall, I. Howard. 1 Peter. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1991.
BRathbun BRathbun January 12, 2020
Man, what a great little commentary on an important epistle. If you are not reading from Marshall for soteriological reasons, you are making a big mistake. Solid, though provoking and reader friendly. Most greek and interpretative discussions are held within the footnotes to avoid being bogged down. Definitely one of the best commentaries overall that I have read.
Davids, Peter H. The Letters of 2 Peter and Jude. PNTC. Eerdmans, 2006.
BRathbun BRathbun January 10, 2020
I just received this commentary and although I have not read all of the commentary as of yet, I wanted to state clearly that Davids supports traditional authorship of both books, ultimately concluding that there is not enough evidence to overturn Petrine authorship of 2 Peter.
Beale, G. K. A New Testament Biblical Theology, A: The Unfolding of the Old Testament in the New. Baker Academic, 2011.
BRathbun BRathbun January 6, 2020
This book revolutionized the way I read scripture, particularly the NT use of the OT, and the OT itself. As well, Beale can refresh or give new interest to OT studies. I've found that since working through this and his BT lectures, there is usually little need for commentaries. What I mean is, especially in the gospels and epistles, I can now usually draw out the argument better and can know what themes or allusions are being made by certain language being used. Tremendous work of tremendous value. If your not sure about spending the money, find his lectures online in many places (monergism.com for one) and listen to those first to get a good preview. Wanting to buy will be almost certain if you enjoy those.
Baldwin, Joyce. Daniel. TOTC. InterVarsity Press, 1981.
BRathbun BRathbun December 10, 2019
Excellent commentary! Had a gift of bringing the historical background to life, much done through the lengthy introduction(60 pgs). What she does here and in the commentary really illuminates each unit while not making too many interpretive assertions, making room for the reader to make some conjecture. She challenges throughout other scholarly assertions of second century authorship as well as claims of historical inaccuracies. Very helpful and enjoyable read indeed. I did find her reading of chapter 5 a bit out of character. The view that Belshazzar saw something through an open steward's door while they were drunk and partying doesn't seem in tune with the straightforward reading of the text. Her theory does seem plausible, but highly unlikely and subjective. As a plus, like I said, it seems out of her character in which she upholds the supernatural and refutes those who want to turn those passages into allegory, i.e. the 3 in the furnace.
Bruce, F. F. The Gospel of John: Introduction, Exposition, Notes. Eerdmans, 1994.
BRathbun BRathbun December 3, 2019
Was led through this commentary by an elder teaching Sunday school. Generated some meaningful conversation. Bruce is still a go-to as a solid, dependable commentator.
Bock, Darrell L. Studying the Historical Jesus: A Guide to Sources and Methods. Baker Academic, 2002.
BRathbun BRathbun December 3, 2019
Great little intro to studies in the historical Jesus by a conservative evangelical scholar. This is one of Bock's specialties. The summary written above is pretty explanatory.
Bock, Darrell L.; Fanning, Buist M. eds. Interpreting the New Testament Text: Introduction to the Art and Science of Exegesis. Crossway, 2006.
BRathbun BRathbun December 3, 2019
A very helpful aid and introduction for how to do biblical exegesis. I found the first part of the book extremely helpful and was able to put all that I had learned into practice almost immediately. The diagramming was probably the most difficult and therefore, the least helpful. Also, most the essays give helpful resources to each subject, i.e. exegesis, textual criticism, grammar, word studies, genre, theology, application, etc.
Beale, G. K. 1 & 2 Thessalonians. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 2003.
BRathbun BRathbun December 3, 2019
Beale's treatment of the Thessalonian epistles is very neat, showing off the cohesiveness of the epistles themselves and together, leaving nothing ataktoi, or disorderly (163-164). Commentary(not including intro) runs at about 240 pages, one of the larger in the series for two of the smaller epistles.
Marshall, I. Howard. Luke: Historian & Theologian (Gospel Profiles, 3). InterVarsity Press, 1998.
BRathbun BRathbun November 19, 2019
Fantastic read. Trustworthy, evangelical treatment of Luke's theology and historical reliability. Essential reading for anyone doing serious study of Luke-Acts!
Beale, G. K. The Erosion of Inerrancy in Evangelicalism: Responding to New Challenges to Biblical Authority. Crossway, 2008.
BRathbun BRathbun November 16, 2019
Great treatment of many contemporary challenges to biblical inerrancy. Surrounding mostly(but certainly not only) OT scholarship issues, Beale shows that there is still no good reason to abandon inerrancy, not that anyone should be surprised. Issues discussed are relation of Ancient Near Eastern myth and OT, Use of OT in the NT(an area Beale is leading the way in), postmodern trends, Isaiah authorship, OT and scientific cosmology and more as well as some helpful appendix material including the Chicago statement on inerrancy and quotes from Barth's 'church dogmatics' exposing his erroneous view of 'errant and fallible' scriptures showing that he shouldn't be a model for evangelical thought on scripture.
Witherington III, Ben. New Testament History: A Narrative Account. Baker Academic, 2003.
BRathbun BRathbun November 7, 2019
Thouroughly enjoyable read. Greco-Roman background and figures presented in a memorable narrative fashion. Will use it in the future. Only pull back is his denial of nearly half of traditional NT authorship and oft wild speculation(although some of his speculation was welcome). Wouldn't recommend to anyone who's not already engaged in or reading from critical scholarship.
Bruce, F. F. New Testament History. Doubleday, 1980.
BRathbun BRathbun November 7, 2019
Classic Bruce, one should read anything they can find of his.
Sproul, R. C. Romans. StAEC. Crossway, 2009.
BRathbun BRathbun October 30, 2019
Reading Sproul is just as pleasant as listening to him. This commentary is written at a level that any laymen van understand with the qualification that they look up some theological terms along the way. Sproul was a Systematic theologian and a pastor and that's where the emphasis of this work lies, although there is the occasional technical issue or greek brought up where necessary.
Hansen, G. Walter. Galatians. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1994.
BRathbun BRathbun October 18, 2019
It may have been a typo in the previous reviewers comments, but Hansen clearly holds South Galatia as the destination. One could see this by the Google books preview below on p.17. He is correct about a later date though. South Galatia, post Jerusalem council date sometime after 50A.D.(p.21). Then narrows to 54-56 (p.22). Hansen ties together Gal.2 and Acts 15, yet doesn't allow for works of the law to mean more than "circumcision and purity laws", contrary to the opposition in Acts 15:5 pushing for gentiles to "keep the law of Moses"(see p.69 and footnote). Egalatarian reading of 3:28. Besides these things, I thouroughly enjoyed reading this and would definitely recommend to intro level readers looking for deeper understanding of the text. Very practical and pastoral. Like Schreiner's 'Galatians', I picked this up and read it through in a few days. Great read. Also, footnotes always begin with chapter and verse so it's not hard to place them in the text. Preferable to some because it doesn't distract one from the main writing.
Schreiner, Thomas R. Arnold, Clinton E. ed. Galatians. ZECNT. Zondervan, 2010.
BRathbun BRathbun October 18, 2019
I would just echo what has already been said positively already about this work, i.e. detail, clarity and up to date. Common sense judgements. Highlights the eschatological aspects of Paul's letter which is not to be overlooked. As far as being too "Lutheran"(previous reviewer), I can only imagine that this refers to his quotes from Luther in the theology in application section(?). I especially loved Schreiner's application myself.
Morris, Leon. The Gospel According to Matthew. PNTC. Eerdmans, 1992.
BRathbun BRathbun October 14, 2019
Kind of lacking on new creation theme and types in first few chapters, excels in Greek word studies and common sense judgements.
France, R. T. Matthew. TNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1986.
BRathbun BRathbun October 14, 2019
Like Morris, France is such a good commentator, that he excels in the intro level tyndale series as well as larger, more technical works. This one may be better than some larger works, sharp exegete!
Plummer, Alfred. Luke. ICC. T&T Clark, 1896.
BRathbun BRathbun October 14, 2019
That one could produce such quality without all the resources and technology of today is truly impressive. This work deserves to be more widely read if the lack of reviews here is any indication. Really enjoyed Plummers work overall. Was such a big help in going through Luke.
Morris, Leon. Luke. TNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1988.
BRathbun BRathbun October 14, 2019
Fantastic. Surprisingly for an intro level commentary, Morris makes one feel like nothing important has been left out. He has a knack for squeezing textual criticism issues, relevant greek discussion, historical background and application all into short paragraphs at a level a laymen can understand. Conservative
Bock, Darrell L. Luke. IVPNTC. InterVarsity Press, 1995.
BRathbun BRathbun October 14, 2019
As should be expected. Fulfills the aim of the series. Relevant contemporary discussion at an introductory level with minimal technical rabbit trails. Even if one disagrees with Bock, they are never left wondering how he gets to his chosen route of interpretation. Conservative. Bock's expertise is the Historical Jesus and particularly the gospel of Luke.