Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah
Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah
Technical
Pastoral

Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah

in Wycliffe Exegetical Commentary

by Richard D. Patterson

from 4 reviews and 4 collections
Pages 416 pages
Publisher Moody Press
Published 1991
ISBN-13 9780802492647

Collections

This book appears in the following featured collections.

Reviews

Add Your Review

4.25 out of 5 based on 4 user ratings
Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah Patterson, Richard D.
PastorTimothy72 July 27, 2021
5 5
I have become a collector of commentaries ever since my seminary days in the 1990s. As such, I am only going to recommend the best overall commentary for each book of the Bible on this site. (Before each minor prophet recommendation, let me first say that every preacher/teacher should have a copy of James Montgomery Boice's two volume set on the Minor Prophets on his/her bookshelf. That's the starting point, in my opinion). For Nahum specifically, for the preacher/teacher I would refer you to Patterson. Yes, he deals a bit more with Hebrew and linguistic issues, but I think he does so in a way that even someone not familiar with Hebrew can understand. His entire commentary is noteworthy and worth having (James Bruckner in the NIVAC is not as technical; O. Palmer Robertson is comparable to Patterson - so it will come down to an individual's preference of style here).
Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah Patterson, Richard D.
Jeremy Pierce (parableman) August 7, 2009
4 5
Richard Patterson had the misfortune of writing his commentary for the WEC, a series that didn't last very long. Bible.org has seen to it to republish some of the volumes of that series, so they are now available again, but for a while this just wasn't easy to get. For that reason, it's had less of an impact than it should have had in Habakkuk studies. Patterson is a careful scholar. I'd place this commentary at the same level as Robertson and Bailey. Robertson is stronger on theology, and Patterson is stronger on lexical issues and historical background. His treatment of linguistic matters seems exhaustive compared to Robertson, who in comparison seems almost to ignore it. He doesn't ignore theology, but it's not his main strength, and Robertson and Bailey both strike me as giving fuller treatments of those elements. Until Bailey came along, Robertson and Patterson complemented each other nicely. I still recommend Bailey as the best overall commentary, but if you have both of the others you're doing very well. [Full Review]
Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah Patterson, Richard D.
Jeremy Pierce (parableman) August 7, 2009
4 5
Richard Patterson had the misfortune of writing his commentary for the WEC (1991), a series that didn't last very long. Bible.org has seen to it to republish some of the volumes of that series, so they are now available again, but for a while this just wasn't easy to get. For that reason, it's had less of an impact than it should have had in Nahum studies and appears in fewer libraries of those who teach the Bible than it deserves. Patterson is a careful scholar. I'd place this commentary at the same level as Robertson and Bailey. Robertson is stronger on theology, and Patterson is stronger on lexical issues, historical background, and literary analysis. Bailey is probably not as strong as either on those issues but a little more balanced than either and able to interact with more recent scholarship. Patterson's treatment of linguistic matters seems exhaustive compared to Robertson's NICOT, who in comparison seems almost to ignore it. Patterson doesn't ignore theology, but it's not his main strength, and Robertson and Bailey's NAC both strike me as giving fuller treatments of those elements. Until Bailey came along, Robertson and Patterson complemented each other nicely. I still recommend Bailey as the best overall commentary, but if you have both of the others you're doing very well. [Full Review]
Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah Patterson, Richard D.
Martin Salter May 18, 2009
4 5
A very fine little commentary for the pastor who still uses Hebrew. Provides plenty of interaction with the Hebrew, with some excellent theological insight for the preacher. Often overlooked but well worth it - cheap compared to others.