Mark
Mark
Technical
Pastoral

Mark

in Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament

by Robert H. Stein

5 Rank Score: 5.66 from 4 reviews, 1 featured collections, and 12 user libraries
Pages 864
Publisher Baker Academic
Published 2008
ISBN-13 9780801026829
In this new addition to the BECNT series, respected New Testament scholar Robert Stein offers a substantive yet highly accessible commentary on the Gospel of Mark. The commentary focuses primarily on the Markan understanding of the Jesus traditions as reflected in this key New Testament book. For each section in Mark, the author analyzes how it fits the immediate and larger context of the Gospel; offers verse-by-verse comments on the words, phrases, sentences, and themes found in the section; and explores what Mark is seeking to teach. As with all BECNT volumes, Mark features the authors detailed interaction with the Greek text. It combines academic sophistication with pastoral sensitivity and accessibility to serve as a useful tool for pastors, church leaders, students, and teachers.

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Robert M. Bowman, Jr Robert M. Bowman, Jr December 11, 2016
Detailed evangelical commentary fully engaging textual and literary-critical issues. [Full Review]
The Baker Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament series seeks to provide “commentaries that blend scholarly depth with readability, exegetical detail with sensitivity to the whole, and attention to critical problems with theological awareness” (xi). A major purpose for the series is to serve the needs of those “involved in the preaching and exposition of the Scriptures” (xi). Robert H. Stein is particularly well qualified for writing a commentary on the Gospel of Mark for such a series. For years he has devoted himself to scholarly research on Mark’s Gospel and also to pastoral training through his work at Bethel Seminary and the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary. The result is a commentary distinguished both by its scholarship and by its practical usefulness for pastors. The introduction to the commentary argues for traditional viewpoints concerning the setting for Mark’s Gospel. The author was John Mark, who based his Gospel at least in part on the eyewitness testimony of the apostle Peter (1–9). The original audience consisted primarily of Gentile Christians in Rome (9–12), and the date for the writing of Mark was in the late 60s, shortly after the death of Peter (12–15). Stein explains why he believes such traditional conclusions are important—and why they are not important—for the interpretation of Mark’s Gospel (7–8). [Full Review]
John Glynn John Glynn September 20, 2008
Unnatributed-d Unnatributed-d May 26, 2008